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Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake)

Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake)

Former residence, 1117 Howe St.

  • Author: peggywat
  • Date Posted: Jun 1, 2015
  • Category:
  • Address: Plaque is on lamppost on the west side of 1100 block of Howe St., near north end of the block.
Downtown-Johnson-Pauline

Photo credit: The William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections, McMaster University Library


Location: Plaque is on lamppost on the west side of 1100 block of Howe St., near north end of the block.

Pauline Johnson or Tekahionwake, Canada’s most famous First Nations poet of the early 20th Century, decided to establish herself in Vancouver in 1909.

There’s wine in the cup, Vancouver,
And there’s warmth in my heart for you,
While I drink to your health, your youth, and your wealth,
and the things that you yet will do

From A Toast

Moving into a modest apartment at 1117 Howe Street, she entertained a wide circle of admirers and literary friends and produced many stories that endure today, including her work based on the Sḵwxw̱ ú7mesh (Squamish) legends told to her by honoured friends Sá7pleḵ’ (also known as Hyas Joe who became known as Joe Capilano), and Líxwelut (Mary Agnes Capilano) of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh-ulh People. Many of these stories went on to form her best-known collection, Legends of Vancouver.

After learning that she was suffering from inoperable breast cancer, Johnson expressed her desire to be buried in Stanley Park. Civic authorities agreed to her request with the proviso that she be cremated. She died on March 7, 1913, just three days before her 52nd birthday. Thousands of people lined Georgia Street to witness her funeral procession. Her ashes are buried near Slhxí̱ 7elsh (Siwash Rock) near Third Beach.

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Moving into a modest apartment at 1117 Howe Street, she entertained a wide circle of admirers and literary friends and produced many stories that endure today, including her work based on the Sḵwxw̱ ú7mesh (Squamish) legends told to her by honoured friends Sá7pleḵ’ (also known as Hyas Joe who became known as Joe Capilano), and Líxwelut (Mary Agnes Capilano) of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh-ulh People. Many of these stories went on to form her best-known collection, Legends of Vancouver.

After learning that she was suffering from inoperable breast cancer, Johnson expressed her desire to be buried in Stanley Park. Civic authorities agreed to her request with the proviso that she be cremated. She died on March 7, 1913, just three days before her 52nd birthday. Thousands of people lined Georgia Street to witness her funeral procession. Her ashes are buried near Slhxí̱ 7elsh (Siwash Rock) near Third Beach.

There’s wine in the cup, Vancouver,
And there’s warmth in my heart for you,
While I drink to your health, your youth, and your wealth,
and the things that you yet will do

From A Toast

 

Borrow works by this author from the Library
Learn more about Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake) at ABC Bookworld