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Emily Carr

Emily Carr

Former studio, 500 Granville St

  • Author: peggywat
  • Date Posted: Mar 1, 2016
  • Category:
  • Address: Plaque is on lamppost in front of 570 Granville St.
Downtown-Carr-Emily

Photo credit: City of Vancouver Archives, CVA 136-34


Location: Plaque is on lamppost in front of 570 Granville St.

After moving to Vancouver in 1906, Emily Carr taught art classes at this address in a rented studio until 1910.

“Woods you are very sly, picking those moments when you are quiet and off guard to reveal yourselves to us, folding us into your calm, accepting us to the sway, the rhythm of your spaces, space interwoven with the calm that rests forever in you.”

From Growing Pains

After a long sojourn in France, studying painting, she rented a studio at 1465 West Broadway. In 1913, she rented Drummond Hall to show nearly 200 art works, then left for Victoria. Emily Carr became one of the first of two British Columbians to win the nation’s foremost literary prize, a Governor General’s Award, for her collection of nineteen “Indian” stories, Klee Wyck, written “for the pure joy of reliving and travelling among the places and people I love.” With the assistance of Ira Dilworth, regional head of the CBC, her debut was to be called Stories in Cedar but it was changed to Klee Wyck, a name accorded to her in Ucluelet on a sketching expedition – meaning ‘Laughing One.’ Published when Carr was sixty-nine, her first printing of 2,500 copies sold out.

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After a long sojourn in France, studying painting, she rented a studio at 1465 West Broadway. In 1913, she rented Drummond Hall to show nearly 200 art works, then left for Victoria. Emily Carr became one of the first of two British Columbians to win the nation’s foremost literary prize, a Governor General’s Award, for her collection of nineteen “Indian” stories, Klee Wyck, written “for the pure joy of reliving and travelling among the places and people I love.” With the assistance of Ira Dilworth, regional head of the CBC, her debut was to be called Stories in Cedar but it was changed to Klee Wyck, a name accorded to her in Ucluelet on a sketching expedition – meaning ‘Laughing One.’ Published when Carr was sixty-nine, her first printing of 2,500 copies sold out.”

“Woods you are very sly, picking those moments when you are quiet and off guard to reveal yourselves to us, folding us into your calm, accepting us to the sway, the rhythm of your spaces, space interwoven with the calm that rests forever in you.

From Growing Pains

 

Borrow works by this author from the Library
Learn more about Emily Carr at ABC Bookworld